June 25, 2024
Different Types of Divorce Laws in Singapore

Divorce laws in Singapore are based on the grounds of fault and no-fault. The grounds of fault are adultery, cruelty, and desertion. The ground of no-fault is based on an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.

Fault divorce:

Under the fault divorce in Singapore, the husband or wife has to prove that the other spouse is at fault in order to get a divorce. The grounds of fault are adultery, cruelty, and desertion. The husband or wife has to provide evidence to the court to prove that the other spouse is at fault. If you are still looking for a divorce lawyer in Singapore, click here.

Adultery:

Adultery is a ground for divorce in Singapore if the husband or wife has an extra-marital affair. The husband or wife has to provide evidence to the court to prove that the other spouse has committed adultery.

Cruelty:

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Cruelty is a ground for divorce in Singapore if the husband or wife has treated the other spouse with cruelty. The husband or wife has to provide evidence to the court to prove that the other spouse has treated him or her with cruelty.

Cruelty is defined as any conduct that causes mental or physical suffering of such a kind as to render intolerable the continued cohabitation of the spouses. The conduct can be physical or mental.

Desertion:

Desertion is a ground for divorce in Singapore if the husband or wife has left the other spouse without any reasonable cause for a continuous period of two years. The husband or wife has to provide evidence to the court to prove that the other spouse has deserted him or her.

No-fault divorce:

Under the no-fault divorce in Singapore, the husband or wife does not have to prove that the other spouse is at fault in order to get a divorce. The ground of no-fault is based on an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. The husband or wife has to file for a divorce on the ground of an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage.

The husband or wife has to file for a divorce on the ground of an irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. The husband or wife has to prove that the marriage has irretrievably broken down. The husband or wife does not have to prove that the other spouse is at fault.

The husband or wife does not have to prove that the other spouse is at fault. The court will grant a divorce if it is satisfied that the marriage has irretrievably broken down.

Conclusion:

The court will grant a divorce if it is satisfied that the marriage has irretrievably broken down. The court will not consider who is at fault when deciding whether to grant a divorce.